Trump is Right: Healthcare is Complex, but it does not have to be

from “If You’re Not Making History, You Are History” by Bob MacDonald

 

No doubt about it, the healthcare system in America is a mess. Obamacare is not working as intended and the proposed Republican replacement is being castigated, even by Republicans, as potentially even worse. Democrats complain the American Health Care Act (ACA) takes too much away from people who need coverage the most. Republicans who oppose the ACA call it “Obamacare-lite” and complain it does not go far enough to repeal Obamacare; and that it creates an entirely new entitlement program.  

The reality is that resolving the healthcare challenge is simple, but it is made complex because Republicans and Democrats have diametrically divergent views on what the end result should be. In simple terms, the Republicans believe the answer lies in assuring that all Americans have “access” to healthcare coverage, while the Democrats believe the answer lies in assuring that all Americans actually have healthcare coverage. There is a big difference between having access to healthcare coverage that an individual needs but cannot afford and providing the needed coverage, regardless of the ability to pay.

This difference exists because the political leaders have failed to address and resolve the most fundamental healthcare question: Is basic healthcare a right or a privilege?

The Republicans believe that healthcare is a privilege, and thus, so long as there is universal access to healthcare coverage (no matter what form or price), the problem is solved. (It should be noted that prior to becoming president, Trump consistently argued that healthcare coverage is a right.) On the other hand, Democrats take the position that every American citizen, regardless of financial status, has a right to receive basic healthcare.

It is this philosophical difference that motivates the Republicans (believing healthcare is a privilege) to propose in the ACA that Medicaid (the state/federal plan that covers low income citizens) funding be slashed. (This is one of the chief reasons why the Congressional Budget Office estimated that as many as 24 million Americans will lose their coverage under the Republican plan.) Conversely, (believing that healthcare is a right) the Democrats used Obamacare to expand Medicaid that covered 15 million people who previously could not afford coverage of any type.

There can be no effective bipartisan agreement on the best form of a healthcare system, unless or until there is a debate and resolution of the question as to whether healthcare is a basic right of every American citizen or a privilege based on means to pay. If, as a society, we decide that healthcare is indeed a privilege, then the Republican ACA plan will work just fine. If, we as a society decide (as virtually every other industrialized nation has) that basic healthcare, like a basic education, is a natural right of every American citizen, then we can work together in a bipartisan way to find the best way to achieve that goal.

Repeal and Replace Obamacare

Ironically, if it is decided that healthcare is a basic right, it would call for the repeal and replacement of Obamacare, because it has failed to achieve the objective of covering all Americans. But such a replacement would be based on the rights of all, rather than the privilege of a few to have healthcare.

If this approach to repealing and replacing Obamacare is taken, the solution is right in front of us. It is a healthcare system already in operation. It has proven to be effective and efficient; it has high consumer satisfaction and acceptance. Maybe even more important, it is a plan that President Trump has endorsed and pledged to protect.

Taking the complexity out of the healthcare solution.

The simplest and most effective way to solve the healthcare crisis is to merge the Medicare and Medicaid systems into one program that, on a phased in basis, will provide basic health care services to every American citizen, regardless of age, social status or income.

There would be no need to create another bureaucracy. Both of these programs have processes and procedures in place and in point of fact are paying for the health services provided by clinics, hospitals and doctors for millions of Americans age 65 and over, along with millions more of low income citizens. Patients covered by Medicare are free to select any of the 95 percent of the doctors, clinics and hospitals that accept Medicare payments. This is not the government deciding or providing the healthcare, but simply being the “single payer” of the benefits provided.

Of course merging and expanding Medicare and Medicaid into a universal healthcare system can’t be done with a flip of a switch, but an organized phase-in of this system over time for those not currently covered under Medicare or Medicaid could smooth the way. This would allow for Obamacare, along with all other forms of healthcare such as individual and employer group plans, to be repealed and phased out at the same pace the new system is expanded.

Certainly there will be concerns about the cost of such a change, but a number of serious studies have concluded that diverting all expenditures on the current system (federal, state, individual and employer) toward this new system and combining this with premiums, deductibles and co-pays based on income, would create more efficiency and actually be less costly than the current system. President Trump has even made this point in interviews.

Using this approach to fixing the healthcare system could be a win-win for everyone. Trump and the Republicans could fulfill their campaign pledge to repeal and replace Obamacare; Trump could remain consistent in his call for universal healthcare and his pledge to protect Medicare and, most important, all Americans could finally join the millions of citizens of every other industrialized nation in the world for whom basic healthcare is a right of citizenship, not just a privilege for the wealthy.

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